Let’s Hear it for King Ludd!

imagesI’ve been working in the technology enhanced learning sector in one form or another for over a decade now, so I reckon I am able to give advice to the next generation of learning technologists without fear of reprisal. So here we go. Pin back your ears and take heed young Padawans, for here it comes:

Embrace your inner Luddite.

This may sound counter-intuitive, but your inner Luddite can be a critical friend and a bridge between you and any academic or teaching staff who are not sure or happy or confident about using technology. But before I explain why, I want to dispel a few myths.

We tend call anyone who refuses to engage with technology a Luddite, but to do so is to do a disservice to Luddites. Wikipedia says that:

“The Luddites were a group of English textile workers and weavers in the 19th century who destroyed weaving machinery as a form of protest. The group was protesting the use of machinery in a “fraudulent and deceitful manner” to get around standard labour practices. Luddites feared that the time spent learning the skills of their craft would go to waste as machines would replace their role in the industry. It is a misconception that the Luddites protested against the machinery itself in an attempt to halt the progress of technology.”

So they weren’t against using technology per se – but using it fraudulently and deceitfully. I’d change those rather pejorative terms  and in terms of education would suggest that we protest the use of technology for the sake of it, which is often to the detriment of better, manual methods. An example might be making notes in a class or lecture. Students could use a laptop or tablet and type their notes or take a photo of a classmate’s notes, but research suggests that the act of putting pen to paper ensures that a cerebral connection is made that isn’t made when technology is used instead, and the author is more likely to remember what he or she has written as a result.

Luddites feared that their skills would be replaced by machinery, and this ‘fear’ is now a concern that we need to be cognisant of. Referring back to note taking, handwriting is a beautiful skill – damn it, it’s an art – but now we type rather than write by hand. I adore calligraphy (but as a southpaw am rubbish at it), but the thought of it becoming automated -or worse still, dying out completely – terrifies me. Because if we lose it, we lose a bit of humanity.  So let’s learn the new skills the twenty first century demands of us, but not to the detriment of the old skills that bring so much joy – and aid learning.

Finally, despite what we may believe, the Luddites did not protest against machinery, and did not want to halt the progress of technology. This suggests that they were actually all for technology – but not from an evangelical ‘this will replace everything’ point of view. They saw it as both a boon and a concern – as something to be embraced, but to be critical of at the same time. And I think a good learning technologist has the same, balanced view.

One other thing. Earlier I talked about being a bridge. I find that academics who claim to dislike technology don’t actually dislike it at all – they just lack confidence, are nervous, and don’t want to admit it. Bridges can be built and crossed if we, as technologists, accept this, and explain how sometimes technology isn’t the answer, that in some cases pens, paper and talking to one another in the same physical space is the best method, and that technology is not a panacea, nor is it evil. It’s just another tool to add to our toolkits, to be taken out and used only when it makes things better. You wouldn’t use a hacksaw to hammer in a nail, and it would be daft to replace an effective old-fashioned teaching tool for something digital just because it’s digital, at the expense of effective learning.


Association for Psychological Science, (2014), Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension, accessed at: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/take-notes-by-hand-for-better-long-term-comprehension.html, date accessed: 1st March, 2018

Wikipedia, (2018), Luddite, accessed at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luddite, date accessed: 1st March 2018

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